Things you may want to know about

Old English Sheepdogs

Known in Europe and N. America as the Bobtail (= docked tail)
compiled by Pauline Baines (Kennel Name - Tailormade)

Barkbybrook Con Una Coda for Tailormade (Jezebel) - Thought to be the first tailed OES to have qualified for entry and to take part in Crufts -
First dog and first tailed OES to be shown in Europe on the pilot pet passport scheme. Featured on greetings cards, TV programmes and radio

Galumphing Tails I Win for Tailormade (Ahab) first tailed dog to be on an ICI Dulux paint tin. Featured in TV programmes and commercials

Old English Sheepdog Health

HEALTH

Hip scores are important in this breed and should be held by the breeder on the Kennel Club Registration Certificates of the parent dogs. This shows that the scores have been assessed by the the British Veterinary Association. (check that it states the correct name of each parent dog on each document). Scores should be low, i.e. each back leg is scored and added together for a total; under 10 is fine, 10-20 acceptable as a total of both legs.
(max. 106 for both legs!!). It is possible that parent dogs have been x-rayed but because the x-rays looked as if the score would be high, the x-rays have not been passed on for BVA assessment which would lead to a Kennel Club certificate and the publication of the hip score in the Kennel Club Gazette. It also affects the breed average score because if they were registered the average would be higher!!! BUYER BEWARE!
H(ip)D(dysplasia) average 21 (preferably under 10) - not enough dogs have been x-rayed to give a good representational average
Parents should be eye tested; hip scored (make sure you see orginal test certificates) Torsion; Umbilical herniae; skin problems; entropion; ectropion Malcolm Willis (Geneticist) says elbow dysplasia particularly luxation of the radius at upper end of bone may well be inherited at a relatively high level.
1,395 dogs by 2004 hip scored; average = 19.68; advises not to breed above 30; since 1995 there has been a decline in submissions leaving the breed open to risk as it ranks high on hip dysplasia. Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) usual onset about 4yrs old believed to be inherited as simple recessive.
Eyes: Second type cataract later in onset but no earlier than 9 months, inheritance unknown. Multiple ocular defects which may include cataracts, persistent pupillary membranes, retinal defects and small eyes - mostly seen from birth, genetics currently unknown. Blood - can suffer from haemophilia B (Christmas disease) - sex linked but rarer than haemophilia A - affects factor IX not VIII (as in Haemophilia A). Almost always affects males. Immune-mediated thrombocytopaenia fairly common and leads to immune system attacking blood platelets. Inheritance unclear.
Haemolytic anaemia can affect middle-aged dogs and some younger, causes mild to severe anaemia though some respond to treatment - inheritace unclear. Cancers - sweat gland tumours and higher than normal brain tumours usually in older dogs (9+). Nasal cavity carcinomas often older dogs - inheritance unknown. Other conditions:- dilated cardiomyopathy where heart has larger chamber size, a thinner heart wall and reduced heartbeat power - may be genetic but not so in all cases. Testicular descent (cryptorchidism) and also dental problems possibly related to complex genetic basis. Hypothyroidism.
Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) is a 'new' canine skin disease sometimes affecting Old English Sheepdogs. SA is a genetic, apparently autoimmune-based skin disease appearing in young adult dogs. It appears to be a primary inflammatory disorder directed against the sebaceous glands which produce fatty oils (sebum). The sebaceous glands become inflamed and are eventually destroyed and hair is progressively lost. Skin biopsies showing a total absence of sebaceous glands are diagnostic for SA. At the onset an SA-affected dog will show varying degrees of hair loss and/or thinning. Patches of dry skin may appear on the muzzle, near pinna or near the tail.

mdr1=gene VERY IMPORTANT - SOME OES MAY BE CARRIERS OF THE MDR-1 GENE AND SHOULD HAVE GENETIC TESTING (ASK YOUR VET OR GOOGLE FOR NEAREST LABS - SALIVA SWAB). THIS GENE IS CARRIED BY SEVERAL SHEPHERD BREEDS. CARRIERS OF THIS GENE CAN BE SERIOUSLY AFFECTED BY CERTAIN DRUGS INCLUDING THOSE USED FOR FLEA AND TICK TREATMENT. SEE LIST FURTHER ON

PCD - All Breeding dogs should be tested for this. As PCD is inherited in simple Mendelian manner; by careful exclusion of carriers from the breeding programme this potentially lethal gene could be completly eliminated from the OES gene pool.
PCD is a respiratory disease affecting Old English Sheepdog (OES) puppies called primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Thanks to the help of several breeders it has been possible to identify the responsible mutation of PCD in OES but also to develop a genetic test determining the genetic status of the dog (healthy, carrier or affected). Testing started on blood samples from OES from January 2010. The price 50 Euros. Here is the address to use for blood samples from the dogs on which you wish to know the status (healthy, carrier or affected).
LUPA Project - PCD
Unité de génomique Animale
Avenue de l'hôpital, 1 B34
4000 Liège Belgique

Each sample should be sent together with the completed certificate and a copy of the pedigree. The results and
the bill will be sent to you by regular post. Please be aware that the test will only be done once there are sufficient number of samples to treat. Consequently it may take a few months between sending samples and the receipy of the results.

For further information, please do not hesitate to contact the Veterinary Surgeon responsible for this project:>
Dr Billen : - +32(0)43664200
fbillen@ulg.ac.be

** = Guide to Hereditary and Congenital Diseases in Dogs - The Assoc. of Veterinarians for Animal Rights - California
**Addison’s Disease; Cataract; Demodicosis; Distichiasis; Entropion; Factor X deficiency; Folliculitis; Granulomatous sebaceous Adenitis; Haemolytic Anaemia; Haemophilia B; Hip Dysplasia; Hypoadrenocorticism; Hypopigmentation lip and nose;
Hypothyroidism; Intestinal Malabsorbtiuon; Lymphocytic thyroiditis; Osteochondritis dissecans; Osteochondrosis; Pododermatitis; Progressive retinal atrophy; Retinal detachment; Retinal dysplasia; Sebaceous adenitis; Spondyiolisthesis (Wobbler’s Syndrome); Thrombocytopenia; Thyroiditis; Vitiligo; Von Willebrand’s Disease


T
A
I

L
S

TAILS
o communicate with you and other dogs and to tell you when they're out of sorts. The tail has supra-caudal scent glands.
voids "fly strike"
mproves fæces formation and texture. When docked, (the OESD in particular) the tail is amputated so close to the body that it can affect the anal muscle thus preventing proper fæces formation. Puppies can die when docked through blood loss and trauma
ooks as Nature intended it to look - they're less "windy"!!
ubstitutes for a rudder when swimming, as a balancing aid when cornering and in old age additional aid to back legs.
The film 101 Dalmatians had two tailed OESD on set.

mdr-
gene



Description
































IMPORTANT - SOME OES MAY BE CARRIERS OF THE MDR-1 GENE AND SHOULD HAVE GENETIC TESTING (ASK YOUR VET OR GOOGLE FOR NEAREST LABS - SALIVA SWAB). THIS GENE IS CARRIED BY SEVERAL SHEPHERD BREEDS. CARRIERS OF THIS GENE CAN BE SERIOUSLY AFFECTED BY CERTAIN DRUGS INCLUDING THOSE USED FOR FLEA AND TICK TREATMENT. SEE LIST FURTHER ON
Country of Origin: England.
Aptitude: Sheepdog and family pet.
Character: Intelligent, considerable adaptability, amiable, social, not particularly alert, boisterous, uncomplicated nature, and likes to be part of the family.
Size: The shoulder height is a minimum of 61 cms. (24 ins.) for dogs and 56 cms. (22 ins) for bitches.
Training: This breed needs gentle and consistent handling during training; they can be defiant! They want to please you and rarely display dominant behaviour but it is something for which one has to watch. I would not consider it a reasonably suitable breed for people with only a little experience of the upbringing of dogs unless they have a lot of time, devotion and commitment. As grooming forms so important a part of the general care for this breed, it is imperative to brush it regularly and from as young as possible. This prevents grooming degenerating into a wrestling match when it is much larger and stronger.
Social Behaviour: The Old English Sheepdog gets on exceptionally well with other animals, dogs and children (with the odd exception of some breeds sometimes! I find black Labradors are usually a "no-no" as they are rather "macho" dogs). Visitors too will be greeted warmly, so make sure your dog is clean and acceptable!
Exercise: This breed needs a fair amount of exercise but it will not misbehave if you miss a day through a bad weather. Most of the breed are crazy about playing with a ball and are well represented as competitors in various sports.
Coat: The coat is luxuriant, rough, tough and long, with a waterproof under-layer. Permitted colours are blue or different shades of grey. The head, neck, front quarters and belly are white, with or without markings. White patches in the blue on the back are not permissible.
Care required: These dogs require regular grooming; brush them thoroughly at least once a week and less thoroughly daily, not over-looking the places where tangles form. During moulting it is quite possible to collect half or even a whole rubbish bag full of hair that you have brushed off it.
Keep the inside of the ears clean and remove both dirt and hair. The claws must be kept short so clip them regularly (see page 5). Excessive hair between the pads of the feet should also be trimmed. For successful showing, the rear of the dog must be higher than the shoulder and this is sometimes accentuated for the show ring.
Sometimes they are trimmed, which, however unpopular with some enthusiasts, is better than a mass of tangled hair. It begs the question though, as to why anyone should acquire a long-haired dog and then have it clipped!

Breed
Standards

BREED STANDARDS - JUDGING THE OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG
see this Kennel Club link
http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/item/143
History

and

Care


















































The Old English Sheepdog probably evolved from the breeding of various working dogs in the southern part of England, possibly culminating in the dog known as "The Sussex Sheepdog". The Russian Sheepdog (TAILED!) is so like the Old English that there must be some connection too.
The breed cannot be traced back much further than 145 years. At that time is was kept as a working dog by shepherds and drovers who were not interested in its appearance, but only in its ability and hardiness as a working dog.
The "breed" was first shown at a show in Birmingham in 1873 was with three dogs and first appeared in the stud book in 1875 when two dogs were entered as Short tailed English Sheepdogs. Until 1888 few were exhibited until The Old English Sheepdog Club was started to promote the showing and breeding of the breed.
Mrs. Fare-Fosse was well known in 1899 for breeding a famous bitch called Champion Fairweather. At 9 months old, she was shown and won four firsts and the C.C. 3 weeks later she won a 2nd CC. and at Bristol just over a year later was made champion. She won 19 CCs in all and was the first breed record holder. She won 5 CCs at Crufts, a record that still stands. She can be seen preserved at the Tring Natural History Museum, Herts. From the turn of the century until 1914 about 180 dogs were registered with The Kennel Club and some 14 breed championship shows were held each year.
A famous stud dog at this time was Ch. Tip Top Weather who was sold to the USA in 1916 for $4,000. His stock formed many of the post war dogs.
Between 1918 and 1939 there were 3 well known kennels "Pickhurst", "Pastorale" and "Hillgarth". After World War II the numbers of dogs had decreased considerably and it is understood that in Scotland Beardies were also used to widen the pool of breeding dogs. In 1947 CCs were first awarded at 6 shows. 274 dogs were registered that year and this gradually increased to 400 over the next 25 years. Then came about the paint commercials and the breed became sought after. In the 70's, registrations were over 5,500 and this caused many rescue problems. Championship shows giving CCs increased. A breed record holder is Ch. Lameda-Zottel Flamboyant and his dam Ch. Zottel Miss Marple of Lameda holds the bitch CC record of 51 CCs. She has had 21 champion puppies.

This is not a breed for everyone, despite its appeal; the coat can take 2-3 hours grooming weekly for a pet and much much more for a show dog.
The rear end must be attended to and in inclement weather the compulsory daily walk will finish with a muddy and wet dog needing attention. A fastidious house owner should not consider this breed. OES are not suitable for flats if there is no garden access, plenty of nearby walks and space to exercise, nor should they be in a house without a garden or with owners who are out at work as these dogs need companionship and attention as the loneliness leads to boredom which in turn could lead to destruction of their surroundings.

Several short walks a day are just as good as one long one and they are quite happy to run in a park or go to the shops but they do need company and to socialise with people and other dogs.
A well cared and presentable OES is always a pleasure to meet and they will give you total undying loyalty for 10-12 + years.

Do choose the breeder of your pup with care. You must go to see the breeder and the parent dogs. The parent dogs should have been x-rayed for hip dysplasia and tested regularly for congenital eye cataracts. A Kennel Club registration certificate should be available showing this but information should be able to be obtained from the Kennel Club if dog registration details are available. Dogs kept in the house are usually indicative of a more socialised dog less likely to have temperament problems than those who only know kennels. A caring breeder should be happy to answer all your questions and question you too! They should give you the pedigree registration papers together with a diet sheet and 24 hours of food and also be prepared to give advice at all times. Always keep in contact with your breeder even if only with a Christmas card and a photograph.

Your puppy will grow into a large strong dog so you need to do training and obedience with them from an early age. They are usually very intelligent and love to please their owner and with time you will find your efforts pay off but you need to establish that you are the leader of the pack tempting as it may be to let them think that they can dictate the terms on which you play.
Because of the commercial publicity in films and advertising many people want to own one not appreciating the work necessary to keep them in the condition they should always be kept. If you do not have the time or think you can short cut with their care, then they are not the breed for you.
If you cannot take a dog on for its life don't even consider having one. It is certainly not fair on the dog or those who have to take over your irresponsibility by having to re-home them. There are so many heart rending stories. Think long and hard first; talk to people whom you see out with OES or go to a show and ask questions.
A dog
is for
life

ALWAY S REMEMBER THAT PURCHASING A PUPPY IS A LIFETIME'S COMMITMENT enabling them to have a LONG & HAPPY
LIFE. Before buying always consider first, your time, you r future and theirs
.
Because of the commercial publicity in films and advertising many people want to own one not appreciating the work
necessary to keep them in the condition they should always be kept. If you do not have the time or think you can short cut with their care, then they are not the breed for you. If you cannot take a dog on for its life don't even consider having
one. It is certainly not fair on the dog or those who have to take over your irresponsibility by having to re-home them.
There are so many heart rending stories. Think long and hard first; talk to people whom you see out with OES or go to
a show and ask questions.

Docking
Legislation

UK legislation

As from April 2007 dogs can only be docked for therapeutic reasons in Scotland and it will be illegal to cross borders to have dogs docked.
Only certain exempted truly working dogs that are listed under regulation in the Animal Welfare Act 2006 ( N.Ireland 2011)will be permitted to be docked in England, Wales from April 2007 (N. Ireland 2011). This does not include OES
Dogs docked after April 2007 will not be able to be shown at fee paying shows in England and Wales but can be in Scotland if legally docked.
There will be fines up to £20,000 and/or imprisonment for anyone contravening the law. See the Animal Welfare Act

Children under 16 will not be permitted to buy dogs http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/welfare/bill/index.htm

Breed Clubs























Breed Clubs - There are 12 Area Breed Clubs who are also available to run shows and give advice.
An alternative to a breed club is a local training club where you can socialise with other breeds and learn the different breed traits.
I am sure that once you have fallen for and loved an OES for its life you will find it difficult to consider sharing your home with any other breed (or human!)

Breed Clubs - worth becoming a member to learn the rules of showing and have your first attempts.

Breed Club Secretaries
Welsh OES Club - Mr. Richard Morris tel
S.E. OES Club -
East Anglian OES Club
Greater London OES Club
N.E. OES Club
Lancastrian OES Club
N.W. OES Club
Midland OES Club
Scottish OES Club
N. Ireland OES Club
Old English Sheepdog Club founded 1888
South Western OES Club

Shows SHOWS - Schedules can be obtained through advertisements found in “Our Dogs” & “Dog World” or Breed Clubs (above). The newspapers usually have to be ordered from newsagents. If you have a Kennel Club registered dog with a full, well kept coat have a go at showing but note all the rules (e.g. no chalking, no trimming etc. and the dog has to be groomed to perfection!). Also you might like to try Obedience and Agility as long as you dog has good joints for agility.
Health

Cataracts. Again it is recommended that there should be a Kennel Club certificate excluding cataracts as these are appearing in puppies and young dogs of the breed. Cataracts can appear in old age as they do in humans but should be considered in a puppy or young dog as a genetic problem. Eye testing can cost the breeder in the region of £80 over several years.
Dew claws - can sometimes be a problem in the older dog when a nail gets thicker and if it starts to curl around on itself. (You should check with the breeder whether these are to be removed and state your preference requesting local anaesthetic). Sometimes when scratching, the dog just might get the nail caught. A watchful owner however, will spot any impending problem and regularly clip the nails. Always endeavour not to cut back to the quick as this is very painful to the dog and causes a lot of bloodshed and needs staunching. If in any doubt take to the Vet. to do.
Deafness - check how the puppy reacts to sounds but remember even a deaf puppy can be very astute by observation and sensitivity and therefore deafness may be difficult to detect. You may be able to give a deaf dog a caring and loving home but make sure that you really are in a position to be able to ensure its special needs are catered for. (Traffic and roads could be a major problem). A genetically deaf dog should never be bred from as this will only spread the problem and there will not be enough suitable homes to care for them.
It is better to collect puppies from a breeder between 8-10 weeks (and this is at an important time when they need to learn to socialise). Any doubts as to the health of the puppy (including sight and hearing) should be resolved as soon as possible with a Veterinary Surgeon who will also tell you the current vaccination régime and when the puppy can begin to mix with other dogs. The breeder should provide a feeding guide and all the information you should need to know and be willing to give advice at any time. Check what wormer the puppy has been given and how many treatments.

Pups
The breeder should provide a feeding guide (+48 hours of food)and all the information you should need to know and be willing to give advice at any time.
Check what wormer the puppy has been given and how many treatments
 

Puppies - of good pedigree, hip and eye tested will not be cheap. As you will see from the cost of the tests and stud fees and any Veterinary care that may be required by a discerning breeder all these will, in effect, add to the cost of the litter (especially if the outcome is say, only 3 puppies). However it should cost less for an undocked puppy as the breeder has not had to pay for this to be done or run the risk of losing a puppy as a result of docking. A family pet bred with the above criteria may be in the region of £850+ from a breeder of special merit. PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU ARE NOT BUYING FROM A “PUPPY FARM” as this only increases problems in the breed. As always when buying from anybody BUYER BEWARE . A good breeder
will also want to know full details of the home and people that their puppies are being sold to, so if you aim to be a good, responsible owner, be prepared for any inquisition from a breeder - if you don't get an inquisition, ask yourself why. MAKE SURE YOU GET A "PUPPY PACK" 24-48 hours of food, welfare care and instructions and m that the breeder breeds to the Club's code of ethics.

PLAN YOUR PUPPY PURCHASE WELL IN ADVANCE (NOT FROM OFF THE SHELF, SO TO SPEAK). Find out who is planning a litter. This will give you time to get all the information about the breeder's dogs, to put your request in for an undocked puppy, and to do all the necessary planning for the newcomer in your household. Please memorise the breed standard to be able to check the authenticity of the parents' heredity and genetic influence.

Puppy farmers usually over-breed from several breeds of dog, register at the Kennel Club/Dog Lovers' Club and sometimes also run stud farms, will offer to deliver or meet you at a motorway service station. Their farms are usually hidden far away from the public eye and they will often sell to pet shops. If you are doubtful about any breeder, do not buy a pup in sympathy but alert the Local Authority in which the breeder lives or the RSPCA.

 
Puppies are like young babies and should not be left unattended for long periods as they may chew electrical wires or other dangerous materials lying around. Avoid “tugging” games as this can make a puppy aggressive. Don’t ever hit a puppy (or adult dog) - or smack with newspaper - especially for fouling indoors. Their body organs have to have time to develop and I have never known a puppy that does not, in time, become house trained with guidance. Never wipe your puppy’s nose in urine or faeces; this is one of the most sensitive organs of its body. Just ask yourself if you were at fault for not meeting your pet’s requirements and remember how long it takes for a human baby to become house trained! It is vital that after food your puppy should be placed outside, as especially when young, the bladder and bowel work almost immediately after food has been imbibed. Worm them regularly or have a faeces culture checked for worms.
Make sure you use set words in training and don’t confuse by changing your command vocabulary, i.e. “sit”, “stand”, and most importantly “stay” e and “no”. Even an older dog needs the companionship of its owner with exercise for the major part of the day and extending your set phrase vocabulary helps build up the communication between you and your dog. They are probably more clever in the way they learn from you than you are at learning from them! Your puppy needs to know that the human family is“pack leader” from the early stages, so they musn’t become “boss” themselves. When they have matured, concessions can be made because they have usually absorbed the principle by then and are happy for you to be their mainstay! You will notice a difference in their attitude when they are no longer "looking over their shoulder", wild eyed, and looking disobedient! They will suddenly start watching your every move and have a feeling of "bonding".
Do not over exercise your puppy. It will have bursts of energy and then bouts of sleep. An over walked dog can get very sore and inflamed pads especially a puppy. If pads look reddened bathe in salted water/Savlon and rest on carpet.
Good breeders will want to hear from their puppy purchasers at least once a year, so please make the effort to do so even if it is only a Christmas card with a photo!

If anyone has asthma/allergies/sensitivities they should not risk taking on an Old English Sheepdog unless they know for sure that
the breed does not affect them.
Hints
Hints. I would recommend pet insurance cover, or that you open a dedicated “bank” account for your dog in which you can put regular monthly deposits to cover future Veterinary care etc. always check exclusion clauses in any policy, e.g. age etc). All dogs by law have to have third party liability cover.
Keep a medical history of your puppy for reference including immunisation dates, worming programme etc.
Enter into your will a clause about your dog's future should he/she outlive you.
It is still a legal requirement for dog collars with identity discs to be worn by dogs at all times.
Care
Check Regularly:-

anal area - for cleanliness as it is important that flies do not get to this area and lay eggs (this is where a tail helps protect but does not substitute for responsible ownership)
anal glands - if a dog rubs its bottom on the ground, it could be that the anal glands are causing a problem or it may be due to worms. The dog should be regularly wormed (or your Vet. Surg. be asked if they will do a culture to see if worms are present) as faeces can spread the worms.
Some wormers disagree with dogs and they can be violently sick so monitor carefully and do not use same wormer again if this has happened.
Also inform the Company whose product they are, for statistical purposes.
mammary glands - in both male and female for abnormal lumps.
teeth - preferably brush daily. The gentle handling of the dog’s mouth regularly helps build a non-aggressive relationship.
prostate - in the middle aged and older male dog
check lumps - these may be just common cysts but get your Vet to check as they may be tumours.
ears - some dogs never have a problem but with long coated breeds they should be checked weekly or even daily - a gentle warm flannel wash around the external area will help clean the skin. If the ear smells and the dog rubs its head, shakes a lot, or yawns a lot as if to clear ear canal, the ear will need to be checked by the Vet in case grass seeds, mites, dermatitis or infection have entered the ear canal. July/August/September are the worst months for barbed grasses (e.g. Foxtail) which act like arrows and often need removing surgically, They are extremely irritant and painful. Avoid walking the dog in any grassland areas where this type of grass grows. Please don't forget to check the ears. If no foreign body is present, ask your Vet if he would do a swab for analysis prior to treatment. Specific medication can then be prescribed rather than trying several on a hit or miss basis.
feet - Often fur balls develop between the pads and these need regular checking as they can cause nasty sores and are obviously painful to the dog.
Cut around the knots with caution because of skin proximity. Check for grass seeds (see above)
skin - watch for any balding, persistent rubbing or scratching. It may be a serious and contagious skin condition which requires being seen by the Vet. and treating a.s.a.p. e.g. sarcoptic mange. When booking to see the Vet. ask the Receptionist what procedure they would like you to follow in case it is something contagious because the waiting area will be inappropriate in case it spreads to other animals.
Eye
Testing
Eye Testing: - Countrywide, but one is often held at Haddenham, Oxon. Details from Miss King on 01844 290426 before 6.00 pm or Mr. Weller after 6.30 pm on 01494 446967 (also glaucoma and litter screening available)
Stud dogs - The Kennel Club hold a list of selected stud dogs who have champion certificates to their name and should have been hip scored and eye tested. Fees for a stud dog could be anything from £280. Always check how many times a stud dog has been "officially" used. If champs probably too frequently for the good of the gene pool.
Puppies - of good pedigree, hip and eye tested will not be cheap. As you will see from the cost of the tests and stud fees and any Veterinary care that may be required by a discerning breeder all these will, in effect, add to the cost of the litter (especially if the outcome is say, only 3 puppies). A family pet bred with the above criteria may be in the region of £850++ from a breeder of special merit. PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU ARE NOT BUYING FROM A “PUPPY FARM” as this only increases problems in the breed. As always when buying from anybody BUYER BEWARE. A good breeder will also want to know full details of the home and people that their puppies are being sold to, so if you aim to be a good, responsible owner, be prepared for any inquisition from a breeder - if you don’t get an inquisition, ask yourself why. MAKE SURE YOU GET A "PUPPY PACK" 24-48 hours of food, welfare care and instructions and that the breeder breeds to the Club's code of ethics.
Puppy Planning
PLAN YOUR PUPPY PURCHASE WELL IN ADVANCE (NOT FROM OFF THE SHELF, SO TO SPEAK). Find out who is planning a litter. This will give you time to get all the information about the breeder's dogs, to put your request in for an undocked puppy, and to do all the necessary planning for the newcomer in your household. Please memorise the breed standard to be able to check the authenticity of the parents' heredity and genetic influence.
Ethics
CODE OF ETHICS AS RECOMMENDED BY THE OLD ENGLISH BREED CLUB

a) The minimum age for a bitch to be mated is 21 months, but not if this is the bitches first season.
bi) Bitches are not to be mated for their first litter after their 5th birthday.
bii) A bitch must not be mated after their 7th birthday for their last litter.
Any deviation from these ages should be by prior written veterinary approval.
c) 4 litters only in a bitches lifetime.
d) Bitches not to produce puppies from more than 2 consecutive seasons.
e) All animals used for breeding should be sound physically, of excellent temperament, and as true to breed type as possible.
f) Dogs not to be used at stud under 12 months of age.
g) As a Breed Club we would advise that all animals are hip x-rayed in an attempt to prevent the spread of hereditary defects and eye checks should be undertaken.
h) No O.E.S. puppies to be "knowingly" sold on to pet shops, puppy dealers, laboratories, or any person dealing in live stock for a living.
Sell only to carefully vetted or recommended homes, giving detailed instructions on general management, and most important, a diet sheet which carries further information on feeding beyond the puppy stage. Prospective owners should also be made aware of the problems of owning an O.E.S. and given guidance on training and exercising and grooming. 8-10 weeks is soon enough for the puppies to leave their dam.
When selling overseas, sell only if the buyer is known or recommended. Buyers should reside in countries having similar standards of animal welfare as the United Kingdom.
Encourage buyers to keep in touch through the life of the dog, encourage them to become members of a Breed Club, even if not interested in showing.
Never breed or keep more dogs than can be looked after personally with individual attention either by self or a kennel assistant. The practice of placing bitches out on breeding terms in unacceptable.
Be prepared to take back any dog whose home may no longer to be able to cope with it, if necessary to buy back on a reasonable basis.
i) This is the conduct expected from members of The Old English Sheepdog Club.
1993. (When buying check if seller adheres to this code of practice
Breed
Records

In 1993 there were 1721 OES KC puppy registrations; 1994=1505;1995=1552;
1996=1385; 1997=1269; 1998=959; 1999=988; 2000=759; 2001=763;
2002=620; 2003=729; 2004=603; 2005=663; 2006=536; 2007=692;
2008=529; 2009=413; 2010=507; 2011=401; 2012=429; 2013=461;
2014=405; 2015=495; 2016=424; 2017=384; 2018=318;
Some litters are never registered and others elsewhere

PUPY
FARMERS
Puppy farmers usually over-breed from several breeds of dog, register at the Kennel Club/Dog Lovers' Club and sometimes also run stud farms, will offer to deliver or meet you at a motorway service station. Their farms are usually hidden far away from the public eye and they will often sell to pet shops. PLEASE AVOID

Bitch
Reproductive

Cycle

Reproductive Cycle for Bitches
The first season will possibly be between 6 and 12 months.
The cycle can be described as 4 phases:-
1. The "anoestrus" phase (when the bitch is out of season) is variable but more commonly the 4 phases are around 6-7 months apart.
2. The "pre-oestrus" phase last approximately 8-13 days. This is the noticeable phase where the vulva is likely to swell and the discharge can start, sometimes clear at first then becoming bloody. Dogs will be attracted at this time and the bitch is likely to "flirt" but it will cause much less hassle if the bitch is kept well away from dogs at this time as large dogs could be difficult to fend off and could cause distress to the bitch.
3. The "oestrus" phase This lasts 4-7 days. If you do not plan puppies keep your bitch well away from dogs. The vulva will be swollen but the discharge will have turned clear or straw coloured. The bitch will usually accept a dog at this time. Ovulation can take place around the 2nd day of this phase but anyone wishing to mate their bitch could ask the Vet to do a test to confirm. Male dog sperm can live for 7 days.
4. The "Metoestrus" phase lasts approximately 6-10 weeks. This is the phase in which puppies would be born if she were mated so the uterus can be active at this phase and if not mated she may have a "phantom" pregnancy (it mimics a real one).
1. Anoestrus phase = 15 weeks approx.
2. Pre-oestrus phase = 8-13 days approx. TAKE CARE
3 Oestrus phase = 4-7 days approx. TAKE GREAT CARE!
Phantom
Pregnancy
Phantom Pregnancies
If you have a bitch you may notice that she has a phantom pregnancy between seasons if she has not been mated; around the time that she would normally whelp had she been mated. She will go off her food, "nest" and be restless and her coat can deteriorate. This can last for 2-3 weeks and the best way to keep her eating is to tempt her with food she likes, a little but often. However you will probably find that in the few weeks leading up to this phase she will eat in abundance and have fat to live off. Just watch that if you are normally fairly strict with her diet in the "gluttony" phase that she does not lose too much weight during her phantom phase. See if you can check weight regularly at the Vets and keep a record yourself or ask them to keep it for you if you are a regular attender
Exercise
Do not over exercise your puppy. It will have bursts of energy and then bouts of sleep. An over walked dog can get very sore and inflamed pads especially a puppy. If pads look reddened bathe in salted water/Savlon and rest on carpet.
Food
FOOD: I find that certain tinned foods upset my dogs and I don't know what animal derivatives are in them although I have been told what they are likely to include!! I try to vary the meals I give but usually for the fully grown dog for breakfast I sometimes give sardines mixed with a little oat bran/ porridge/or 2 sausages. The early evening meal consists of a combination of vegetables (cabbage/spinach/swede/parsnip/carrots/celery finely chopped) with cooked
well rinsed rice and 1 cooked sheep's heart chopped and 1 large cooked chicken thigh (without bone) shredded, 2 teaspoons tomato puree. A stainless steel 71/2" dog bowl is usually two thirds full. At bed time 2-4 large "Bonio" type biscuits depending on the size of dog/bitch.
Keep a check on weight.
Do not exercise your dog after its main meal for at least an hour. Latest research says do not feed from a raised bowl. Quite a few are dying from "bloat"/gastric dilatation/torsion in the night (see enclosed extract page 21).. The dog can't settle and is in great pain; needs urgent Veterinary treatment.
Tomato ketchup added to dinner (1 dstsp.) can help to prevent cystitis.
Bones. Avoid giving cooked or even raw bones (especially not chicken bones) as they can splinter and perforate internal organs and may even cause death; a dog's teeth can break on bones so although they help clean teeth it may be safer not to give at all.
Make sure that the food is only faintly warm or cold when fed - NOT hot.
Weight

Ideal weights in kgs. for OES dogs27-41 bitches23-27

Emergemcies
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
IN CASE OF ILLNESS - Often your Vet. will prescribe medicine to treat your pet's illness. Here is how to give them:
1. Place the palm of your hand over the bridge of your pet's nose. Your thumb and middle finger should circle the muzzle and fit behind each upper canine (long) tooth.
2. Gently press her lips against the teeth to make the jaw drop .
3. With the other hand, quickly poke the pill to the back of her tongue, then hold her mouth closed and stroke her throat until you see her swallow.
When they lick their nose you know it's gone!.
4. OR ask your supermarket for leftover slices of ham and wrap the pill well into the ham or even a piece of cheese if the dog likes cheese
WARNING SIGNS OF SERIOUS ILLNESS - The following may signal that your pet needs medical attention. You should seek veterinary care.
1. Anytime you find a lump on your pet's skin.
2. If your pet seems unusually short of breath.
3. If your pet experiences a sudden change in appetite
4. If your pet starts losing weight.
5 If your pet drinks often and urinates more frequently.
Pulse
HOW TO CHECK YOUR PET'S PULSE
Feel on the inside of the back thigh where the leg joins the body. Normal for dogs is 70-150 beats a minute.
Coughing
COUGHING CAN BE SERIOUS - Coughing is the most common sign of heart disease in pets. If your dog has been coughing for more than 24 hours, see your Vet. Coughing is extremely rare in cats and should always be seen by a Vet.

Emergency

Injury

IN CASE OF INJURY - Always have a pet first-aid kit handy in case your pet is injured. Here are some Veterinarians' recommendations on what to include:
1. Your Vet.'s telephone number, plus the number of an emergency weekend or night time vet.
2. Gauze rolls or pads
3. Absorbent cotton
4. Scissors, preferably with rounded tips.
5. Hydrogen peroxide. Ahab at photoshoot
6. Hydrocortisone ointment (Greendale Farm 2002)
7. Eyewash.
8. Tweezers
9. Rectal thermometer
10. Syringe (without the needle) for giving oral medicines
11. Anti-diarrhoeal medicine (for dogs only)
12. Upset stomach medicine (for dogs only)
13. Antihistamine liquid
14. A clean white sock - to slip over an injured paw, to keep the wound and your floors clean until the bleeding has stopped.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY (contd.)
WHEN BAD BREATH IS A SERIOUS CONCERN
1. A sweet, fruity scent could indicate form of diabetes (mellitus or insipidus), especially if your pet is drinking or urinating more than usual.
2. A urine like smell might mean kidney disease
3. A mouth odour that Vets simply describe as "foul" when accompanied by vomiting, loss of appetite, swelling of the abdomen or yellowing of the eyes or gums could indicate a liver disorder.
4. Have you been cleaning their teeth daily? ... Check for dental decay. Have you wormed recently? Have you checked dewlaps for redness and fungal infection
HOUSEPLANTS THAT CAN HURT YOUR PET
1. Philodendron
2. Dieffenbachia
3. Jerusalem cherry
4. Yew
5. Caladium
6. Spider plant
7. Airplane plant
8. Cyclamen
9. Foxglove
10. Dragon Tree
11. Holly
12. Mistletoe
13. Azalea
14. Poinsettia
15. Rhodendron
15. Mother in law's tongue
Vets recommend that you put houseplants where pets can't get them.
Dehydration
TESTING YOUR PET FOR DEHYDRATION
Gently lift the skin along your pet's back. Normally it will snap back into place. In dehydrated pets, however, the skin loses elasticity, causing it to stay up in a ridge. If this happens, it's an emergency - see your Vet right away.
HOW A CARROT COULD SAVE YOUR PET'S LIFE!
When a pet has bad teeth, bacteria can get into circulation around the gums. The bacteria float around the bloodstream and eventually settle on the heart valve. To help keep your pet's teeth clean, brush or scrub daily. In addition, giving your pet raw carrots and hard rubber toys to chew will help keep the teeth clean.
SYMPTOMS OF INTERNAL BLEEDING IN PETS
1. Blood in vomit
2. Blood in the urine.
3. Pale pink or white gums
4.Listlessness
Perform the following test:
Press a finger against your pet's gums. If they don't turn pink after a momentary whiteness, she could have lost large amounts of blood. See your Vet. immediately

DRUGS

MDR-1 GENE

DRUGS that could seriously harm Old English Sheepdogs, Border Collies or other shepherding breeds who carry the mdr-1 gene
ACEPROMAZINE - ACP (acepromazine) The following has been forwarded by an ADA member (9/05) and it may well be worth asking questions about it:-
ACP (acepromazine) can have the complete opposite effect, instead of calming the dog it can send it completely "ape". If a dog has tendencies to seizures it will trigger them. Even if a Border Collie has never had a seizure but is genetically disposed, it will start them "seizing". It lowers blood pressure considerably which can have disastrous results. When my dogs have surgery (spaying/neutering etc) I make the vet sign a paper to say they will NOT use ACP either by injection, tablet or any other way of using the stuff. They have no pre-med whatsoever. At the Manchester show a few years ago an exhibitor gave her BC only half a pill and I had to help her to carry him to her vehicle. She drove straight to a vet and almost lost her dog. She hasn't been in the show ring since. She had given him half a pill (the vet said to give him 3 tablets!!!!) because he was a bit nervous of being gone over by a judge. I've seen dogs take days to recover.
Also, if a dog is prone to seizures, talk to the vet about avoiding the use of phenothiazine tranquilizers (such as acepromazine) and ketamine. Also, certain breeds are thought to have problems with certain drugs, including Belgian Shepherds, Greyhounds and other Sighthounds, Brachycephalic dogs (such as Pugs), and Mastiffs, Boxers and Bull Terriers (Acepromazine), so be sure the vet is aware of this before the dog has surgery. Note that Acepromazine and possibly morphine are among the drugs that Collies and related breeds (Australian Shepherds (including miniatures), English Sheepdogs, Old English Sheepdogs, Shetland Sheepdogs, Longhaired Whippets and Silken Windhounds) may react too.
IVERMECTIN for demodectic mange - http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_ivermectin.html
Side effects generally do not occur with any anti-mange doses of ivermectin except in Collies, Shetland sheepdogs, Australian shepherds, and Old English Sheepdogs, though some individual animals that are not members of these sensitive breeds may also be prone to side effects. (These breeds should not be fed farmed salmon which is treated with Ivermectin - animal poo may also contain it.) Collies with Ivermectin sensitivity have been found to have a mutant gene for what is called the "P-glycoprotein There is now a test for P-glycoprotein mutation so that Ivermectin sensitive dogs can be identified. This is a DNA test for the mdr-1 gene using an oral swab. Test kits can be ordered directly from the Washington State University Veterinary School via http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-vcpl or Bristol University Bristol
DNA Tests can also be done by contacting this site
http://www.laboklin.co.uk/laboklin/showGeneticTest.jsp?testID=8032

Dogs who test as having a mutated mdr1 gene OR dogs from afflicted breeds* who have not been tested for the mutation should avoid these drugs.
Drug names in bold are the generic drugs identified as problems by the scientists from the VCPL at Washington State University . Below each generic drug is a list of some of the synonyms, brand, and trade names for the generic drug provided by BusterAlert.org. More drugs are likely to be added as mdr1 research progresses .

Metronidazole (anti-biotic)- has caused dizziness and vomiting in some OES

Drugs PROVEN to Cause Neurotoxicity

Abamectin

Acanol

Acarexx

Ace

Acepro

Aceproject

Acepromazine

Acevet

ACP

Acqta

Adriamycin

Adriblastina

Advantage DUO

Anti-Diarrhoeal  

Atopica

Atravet

Avermectin

Bimectin

BMD/Ivomec

Butorphanol


Caelyx

Cicloral

Ciclosporin

Citomid

Cryoperacid

Cyclosporin

Cyclosporine

Deroser

Diahalt

Diamode

Diarr-Eze

Diarrhoea Relief

Digibind

Digitalis

Digoxin

Dolorex

Doxil

Doxolem

Doxorubicin

Doxotec

Ecomectin

Equell

Equimax

Equimectrin

Eqvalan Formula

Gengraf

Heartguard

Hurplex

Hydroxydaunomycin

Hydroxydoxorubicin

Hydroxyldaunorubicin

Immulem

Imodium

Imogen

Imperim

Ivercare

Ivercide

Iverhart

Ivermectin

Iver-On

Iversol

Ivexterm

Ivomec

Kao-Paverin

Lanoxicaps

Lanoxin

Lemblastine

Leurocristine

Lomotil

Lop

Loperacap

Loperamide

Mapluxin

Mectizan

Megamectin

Modusik-A

Myocet

Neoral

Nodiamex

Noromectin

Oncovin

Optimmune

Oxicina

Panomec

Permidal

Phoenectin

Pramidal

Primectin


Privermectin

PromAce

Restasis

Raxamida

Rediarin

Rubex

Sandimmune

SangCya

SparMectin

Stadol

Stromectol

Supremunn

Top-Dal

Torbugesic

Torbutrol

Torphajet

Tri-Heart

Unimectrin

Valfam

Velban

Velbe

Vinblastine

Vinblax

Vincasar

Vincrex

Vincristine

Vintec

Virbamec

Zimecterin

 

Drugs SUSPECTED to Cause Neurotoxicity (research is ongoing)

Abraxane

Analfin

Apokyn

Asotax

Astramorph

Avinza

Biquin

Bris Taxol

Chinidinum

Cin-Quin

DepoDur

Doloral

Domperidone

Duralmor

Duramorph

EPEG

Etopophos

Etopos

Etoposide

Formyxan

Graten

Infumorph

IsonaRif

Kadian

M-Eslon

Mitoxantrone

Mitroxone

Morphine

MOS

Motilium

MS Contin (MSC)

MSIR

Neotalem

Novantrone

Ondansetron

Onxol

Oramorph

Paclisan

Paclitaxel

Praxel

Quinact

Quinaglute

Quinalan

Quinatime

Quinidex

Quinidine

Quinora

Rifadin

Rifamate

Rifampicin

Rifampin

Rifater

Rimactane

RMS

Rofact

Roxanol

Statex

Taxol

Toposar

Vepesid

VP-Tec

Zofran

Toxocariasis
Toxocariasis
Article re-printed by kind permission of Dogs Today Magazine
Over the past few years, considerable media attention has focused on toxocariasis. A lot of reporting has been inaccurate. Many people have been left with the incorrect impression that toxocariasis can only be caught from dogs.
Toxocariasis is caused by round worms. Toxocara canis affect dogs and foxes and Toxocara cati are found in cats.
Toxocara eggs are excreted in faeces. Recent research shows only one per cent of dogs excrete eggs compared with ten per cent of cats and 50-60 per cent of foxes. The dog has been much maligned.
NO RISK
In dogs, only puppies up to six months old and pregnant bitches excrete eggs. However, even if contaminated faeces are passed, the eggs take more than two weeks to become active. Therefore, scooping poop eliminates the risk of infection.
Eggs need to be eaten for toxocariasis to be caught by humans. In human studies, out of 1.5 million people tested for the toxocariasis antibodies, only one person was positive and they had no symptoms.
Media stories claiming that toxocariasis causes blindness in humans are untrue. No case has been documented in medical journals. What can occur, is impaired vision if a larva lodges in the eye but this is extremely rare. A far more common disease is toxoplasmosis caused by a parasite in cat droppings or in under-cooked meat. This disease can cause blindness and occassionally death in very young babies. This is the reason why ante-natal clinics warn pregnant women not to handle cat litter trays.
BRACKEN

FERN/BRACKEN spores are said to be carcinogenic and are apparently at their most dangerous when they spread around July time. Best to avoid this type of undergrowth at that time (humans and animals).

CHOCOLATE
CHOCOLATE IS REALLY TOXIC TO PETS! - Yes! Chocolate is a tasty toxin which, like caffeine, is dangerous to dogs and cats when eaten in large quantities. Baking chocolate is the most dangerous. Keep chocolate out of reach of pets (&humans!) at all times. Theobromine 200-5500mg/kg can prove fatal. Milk choc = 50 mg/oz; Dark = 150 mg/oz; bitter = 400 mg/oz
GRAPES
GRAPES/RAISINS CAN CAUSE RENAL FAILURE Recently been reported from Canada and USA (Animal Poison Control Centre) that grapes are toxic too and caused renal failure>death) see http://www.aspca.org
LEISHMANIASIS
Testing for Leishmaniasis http://pcwww.liv.ac.uk/testapet/
CATERPILLARS
Procession caterpillars are deadly poisonous and have now been found in UK (2007)
BLOAT/
GASTRIC
DILATATION/
TORSION

Gastric dilatation/torsion/ "bloat"
In gastric dilatation, the stomach becomes inflated with gas. This is a veterinary emergency and may affect any breed. Gastric torsion occurs in deep chested breeds when the stomach twists, trapping gas inside.
The cause of these problems is uncertain. It is possible that the "wrong " bacteria in the gut cause fermentation and inflation. Some greedy dogs swallow air with their food, and this some say, coupled with vigorous exercise after feeding, is thought to make stomach torsion more likely. Both these conditions make the stomach taut like a drum and it can then twist. The dog can't settle and is in great pain. The dog may retch and bring up white froth. If your dog has been diagnosed with gastric torsion and has had a diet of dried food, it may be worth asking your Vet to record and also inform the food company. From the stories I have heard dried diet seems to have been used in a great many cases. Suggest food should be moistened (with gravy) to make it swell before entering stomach. Better still feed fresh food.
Treatment
Unless treated VERY quickly, the dog may die. The Vet. can often deflate a stomach inflation by inserting a tube into the dog's stomach, but the vast majority of gastric torsions require emergency surgery (which is reported to be the best long term solution).
As a preventative measure, don't feed deep-chested dogs from a raised bowl and don't exercise them for at least one hour after feeding. (this is in light of recent USA research). http://www.vet.purdue.edu/epi/update2.htm

GROOMING
GROOMING & PRESENTATION of the OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG
From the moment a puppy is collected from the breeder, the beautiful cuddly bundle with short black and white hair begins to grow and change. The black body coat grows out very quickly and a new lighter grey coat comes through. The tip of this coat then appears to turn brown and can be broken off with your fingers. The white coat grows longer and quite fluffy. This is the best time to teach your puppy to lie on its side while you brush gently with a soft brush, thus getting him ready for more strenuous grooming sessions in future.

By the time the dog is 21/2 to 3 years old he will have grown his mature coat which is a double coat consisting of a soft undercoat and a much harsher, profuse out er coat. The head, shoulders and legs (which are usually white) also change from the soft fluffy coat to the much harsher coat.
To prepare the Old English for the show ring, one has to commence preparation quite a few weeks beforehand. First re-examine the ears (you' will have been doing this on a regular basis anyway), removing any excess hair which may be growing inside. Make sure the ears are clean and that there are no lumps of wax (which could cause a great deal of pain and make the dog rub his head against a wall losing his head coat in the process!)
During your dog's show career don't let him play with a small puppy - it is so easy for the puppy to remove the dog's head coat, and this takes a long time to return. Next re-examine the feet for lumps of soil or mats between the pads (again you should have been doing this on a regular basis!) remove these and any hair which may be causing discomfort. I have seen many dogs in the ring which have been limping and upon examination they have been found to have a lump of chewing gum between their pads.
To groom your dog thoroughly lay him on the table, spray rain water lightly on to his coat and then make a parting of the hair along the back and with the fingers separate any mats. Do not use the comb until the mats have been thoroughly broken up otherwise too much undercoat will be removed. I would suggest that the mats be broken into small pieces and combed out systematically. However there should not be too many of these if you are grooming your dog regularly! When one line of hair has been combed out brush the hairs upwards, taking care not to break off the guard hairs as you remove the undercoat, then start on another line, working in this way until the whole of one side of the dog is completed, special attention being given to the underparts of the body and behind the ears (watch out that you don't harm the nipples but wash any dirt off them)
Reverse the dog and groom the other side in the same manner. Then stand the dog on the table and brush out the loose hair. Don't bath a dog until they have been thoroughly groomed and then only if the dog's coat is dirty or has been in the sea. Bathing is best done a week before the show, to enable the coat to return to the harshness and texture it should have. There is nothing worse than a judge going over one's dog and then that judge displaying how dirty their hands have become.
Make sure you rinse away all the shampoo and repeat the whole process. Finally rinse off with fresh water until the water runs clear and there are no signs of soapy areas left. Immediately dry very thoroughly around the eyes and ears and squeeze as much water as possible from the legs.
After the washing process, place the dog on a blanket covered table as this helps the drying process. Drying with a hair dryer, give special attention to the head coat to make every hair stand out until the head looks like a large puff ball. Shoulders should then be groomed to enable the coat to lie down close to the skin and then the hair of the loin should be dried "up and out" to make the rear end of your dog look as large and round as possible.
Further emphasis should be given to the front legs, drying them from the feet upwards, brushing and lifting the hair to tease out the loose undercoat and to make the legs look as large as possible. The rear legs are done in a similar way but do take care that the heat of the hair dryer is very low when reaching the stomach and genitals.
When exhibiting your dog should be trained to stand still whilst the judge is examining the head, mouth, eyes, bone, body etc. and then you must be able to move your dog on a loose lead in whichever direction the judge may ask you to go.
When all the exhibits have been observed individually by the judge make sure you have got your dog standing correctly, groomed to perfection and do not forget to hold its head up in order to make a good impression for the judge's final analysis.
A few tips for the show ring:
1. Never crowd other exhibitors. Your own dog can be shown to better advantage if a space is left before and after.
2. Don't race into the ring to be first. It is not only bad manners to push other exhibitors but a good well groomed, healthy dog will stand out no matter where they stand in line.
3. Do keep your dog under control in the ring. There is nothing worse than a dog jumping up and barking to upset all the other ones.
4. Practice well at home with your dog until you feel you and your dog are moving in harmony. When moving talk to your dog in order to keep them relaxed and happy.
5. Showing dogs is a hobby. Don't get upset with a judge or fellow exhibitors if your dog doesn't fulfil your hopes for that day. All judges don't interpret the Breed Standard in exactly the same way unfortunately! Therefore sometimes one wins and sometimes one doesn't. 6. Don't chalk and don't trim - your dog should be natural and well groomed. Watch the other exhibitors closely to see how winners look compared with the "also rans". Sometimes it is difficult to equate the fact that this is supposed to be a working breed when one sees the cosmetic results in the ring! If your dog has a tail, the tail should not be judged but the dog has to be seen to be as well presented and trained for the ring as the docked counterpart.
?First tailed OES to have qualified for Crufts - Jezebel - Barkbybrook Con Una Coda for Tailormade
SHOWS
SHOWS:
Crufts NEC Birmingham usually March.
Other shows to look out for are: W.E.L.K.S., Belfast; Birmingham Nat.; Scottish KC; S. Wales, Paignton; Nat. Working Breeds; E. England; Leeds; Bournemouth; Welsh KC; Scottish KC; City of Birmingham; Richmond; Darlington; Driffield; Midland Counties; Working Breeds of Scotland; L.K.A.; NE OES; NW OES; OES Club of Scotland; OES Club of N. Ireland; OES Club; SE OES Club; SW OES Club; Lancastrian OES Club; Midlands OES Club. OES Club of Wales etc.
SHOWING
Show and Registration Terminology Kennel Names - (Prefixes/Suffixes) - Assuming your puppy's breeder has registered the puppy with The Kennel Club, its name is likely to commence with the breeder's affix - in this case a prefix. Some better known affixes are Lamedazottels, Brinkley, Shepton, etc. If you plan to breed, you may apply to The Kennel Club for an affix for an annual fee. Your puppy could then have this affix attached to its registered Kennel Club name e.g. Shepton - (breeder's affix)then chosen name, say Utopia of/by/with/from - then your affix now as a suffix (say) Mutopia. End result = Shepton Utopia by Mutopia. Any puppies born to Utopia could be registered at The Kennel Club as Mutopia (the affix now is the prefix) and then any names you decide upon.
My bitch is registered as Barkbybrook (affix of her breeder) Con una Coda (chosen name) for Tailormade (our affix used as a suffix. If she had puppies one could be registered as Tailormade (our affix now used as a prefix) Whoopee (chosen name) i.e. Tailormade Whoopee. Any purchaser may then wish to have registered their own affix as a suffix to that name.
If you scan the pedigree that comes with your puppy you will be able to trace its lineage and if you go to dog shows you will probably spot one of the breeders of its antecedents in the show catalogue.
On your puppy's pedigree you will probably notice some writing in red or alternatively with an asterisk beside the names and "Ch.". These will be the names of the dogs/bitches who have been made up to Champions at Championship Shows.
Shows. There are various Shows which have to be held under The Kennel Club rules and if your dog is registered with The Kennel Club it is not supposed to enter un-regulated shows. To enter a show you first have to know which one you would like to go to and The Breed Club Secretary could help you with this or preferably take a "dog" paper such as "Our Dogs" or "Dog World" and these list shows together with the Secretary's name from whom you can obtain a schedule. Your entry form should be completed clearly and signed and returned to the Show Secretary with the cheque for entry fees by the closing date given.
You have a responsibility not to take a sick dog to a show.
 
Exemption Shows These are often Charity based Shows
where because size and venue limit entries, the classes are often made up of "A.V" - Any Variety - of say, puppies over 6 months. There may be a separate class for each of the dogs and bitches. Dog classes usually take place first. Some times the classes are mixed and therefore no bitch in season should be shown. There are a variety of other classes that could follow, up to possibly Veteran Dog/Bitch.
Open Shows. Judges at these Shows may not be someone from the Breed but may have acquired a good knowledge of the breed and have been accepted by The Kennel Club as a General Judge.
This type of Show is particularly useful to the novice especially if it is a Breed Club Open Show. These shows will let you take the first steps in showing and give you a chance to observe others like yourself and to sum up the other dogs. The classes in these shows vary depending upon the likely numbers entering but there are almost certain to be puppy classes for dogs and bitches over 6 months of age. Other classes could include Maiden Bitch/Dog, Junior Bitch/Dog Postgraduate Bitch/Dog Limit Bitch/Dog Open Bitch/Dog and Veteran Bitch Dog. Veterans are usually over 7 years of age and may have been former Champions. The "professionals" are usually only seen at these shows when show training a young dog.
Wins at an Open Show do not qualify Old English for entry to Crufts (currently) although some less well known breeds where there are few in the breed can sometime qualify at these Shows. Having said that, currently if an OES is the overall winner of the whole show as puppy or adult, then they do qualify.
Open Shows are the stomping ground for future champions and the also rans. When you enter your dog get someone to take a photograph of you in the ring alongside the other competitors and also a video. Be very self critical of the photographic results and if you really can see no fault in your dog (read the breed standards carefully, watch for presentation, movement and cleanliness) then you can only presume that the judge was looking at something else when choosing their line up - it might even be the person on the end of the lead and not the dog!
 
Championship Shows: Judges at these shows are specialist judges who may be able to judge more than one breed. However if it is a Breed Club Show it is more likely to be someone who has bred and owned the breed for a number of years who has been given judging status by The Kennel Club .
Placings in certain classes at this type of Show qualify you for entry to - the big one - Crufts! Crufts is usually held about March time at the NEC Birmingham.
To qualify, your dog has to get a 1st or 2nd in Puppy or Junior Classes or a 1st or 2nd (sometimes 3rd will qualify) in Limit Postgraduate and Open classes. A first (and second) can qualify your dog for life for entry whereas a third will only qualify for the next year.
To enter limit classes you will see in the schedules that your dog should not have won more than five firsts in other competitions If they have, you have to enter the next class up - Postgraduate where no more than seven firsts should have been won. If they have, you have to enter the next class up which is Open to all dogs who qualify to enter.
Should you be lucky to win your class then you will be in the final line up of all dogs/bitches for Best Dog/Bitch in Breed (unless you entered other classes but were beaten).
The winner from the Best Dog and the Best Bitch in Breed can then go forward for Best in Show. The puppy classes also have a final line up for Best Puppy in Show.
At Championship Shows the Breed winner having gained a Challenge Certificate then has to go before the Group Judge, i.e. the Pastoral Group Judge as that is now the category for Old English Sheepdogs (until 1998 is was called Working). If your Old English wins against all the other Pastoral breeds, it then goes forward again to be judged for Groups/Best in Show. The judges will usually all be different for all these stages. To be chosen as Best in Show your dog will have competed against the winners from all the other Groups: Toy, Gundog, Working, Hound and Utility. A Challenge Certificate has been won and a new Champion is on the way to being born! Three C.Cs. need to be won in one year under different judges to qualify a Champion.
Crufts - when you have your qualifying win at a Championship Show you can apply about October time to The Kennel Club for an application form to enter Crufts. The classes are much the same as those for Championship Shows with the same procedure.
To win Best in Show at Crufts is every breeders'/exhibitors' dream! To my knowledge an Old English has never won - probably just as well as the breed would become a rescue problem yet again!
PET
PASSPORT
PET PASSPORT SCHEME - New rules apply from 2012. Check after Brexit.
MISCELLANEOUS
COLLARS - (Please - never use chain choke collars or electric training collars).
WATERPROOF JACKETS WITH LEGS - and extras such as boots and head cover can be made by and obtained from: -
Country Mun see page 31 OR Weathertogs http://www.weathertogs.co.uk/prices.html
The one pictured is from another source who has since given up.
DEAF DOGS might benefit from the Pet Pager if given the right training and they are not scared of it. It vibrates on the neck collar. See http://www.britishdog.co.uk. The website lists other electric shock collar equipment which I would never recommend.
HEAVY DUTY “BOOTIES”: -
Paws & Co. 36 Fairfax Road, Swiss Cottage, London NW6 4HA Tel/Fax 0207 722 0035 enquiries@pawsandco.com
£30 for polar (snow?) VAT and postage included. Need to measure back of large pad to front of front two pads. Sizes 1½” to 4”. 4” for big dogs.
Type of footwear used by rescue dogs.
"CLICKERS” for training plus instruction leaflet.
Pet Behaviour Centre,
Upper Street,
DEFFORD. Worcs.
WR8 9AB
Tel. 01386 750615 Approx. £2-£3 Jezebel - Italy 2002
K9 LIGHT COLLARS - reflective plastic with velcro fastening and small red flashing lights. Ideal for night time and early morning walks. Usually available from Pet Shops. Large about £16. A "must" for any careful dog owner in winter evenings/mornings.
NOISES ON TAPE FOR HELPING PUPPIES ADAPT WITHOUT FEAR TO A HUMAN LIFESTYLE!
Jon Bowen BVSc Vet and Animal Behaviour Counsellor - information on tapes can be obtained on email:- john@soundsscary.com
BOOTS CANVAS WATERPROOF (4) LARGE £19 + £1 P& P.
VET BOOT virtually waterproof (each) large £11.50 + £1 p & p for injured pads etc. Also do RAIN COATS:-
COUNTRY MUN, Bines Green, Partridge Green, Horsham. W. Sussex. RH13 8EH. Tel. 01403 711303 Fax 01403 710690
CARTS FOR PARALYSED DOGS - Monica Hill Dog Mobile, collapsible cart
Tel.: 01782-396427 or Bob Griffiths Tel: 01132-869979
SKIN PROBLEMS - Bob Grass's Skin Cures. Tel. 01302 344872 also try pureed spinach in dog food every day.
EPILEPSY MAGAZINE; Phyllis Croft Foundation, 77 Upland Road, Billericay. Essex.

Naming these products does not indicate endorsement
INTERNATIONAL
OES
MAGAZINE
There is a quarterly (Feb., May, August, November) OES Euro magazine (German and English) circulated by Frau Colette Hornig. It is usually excellent value. It costs ?? Euros per year commencing in March and can be paid by credit card. Contact email is editor@oes.de Do consider getting it.
Extract
OES ARTICLE
Extract from article by the late Eric Minett (?1950s)
The origin of the OES remains a mystery which no amount of research has so far solved.
A very similar breed figures in paintings of the 15th century by Durer and van Eyck. Some similarity is also seen in a painting "The Shepherd's Dog" by Rosa Bonheur in the Wallace collection. It is, perhaps, not surprising that there are so few paintings showing the breed in those days when one remembers the system of patronage and that the subject of portraits were almost sporting or lap dogs. Working dogs in those days in those days would obviously be disassociated from the Lords and Ladies.
Amongst the various sheepdogs of other countries there is one, the E. Russian Ovwcharka* (*just means Sheepdog) which bears a strong resemblance but, be that as it may, the distinctive gait of the breed (the Bobtail roll) is not seen in any other.
It is noteworthy that portraits of the breed in the middle of the last century show a very different dog from that of today. The coat was much shorter and less profuse, particularly on the head and legs. Its colour often brown or sable. In addition "bobbing" was not universal.
Docking is, however, not a modern innovation and it would be true to say that nowadays it is the product of conformity. There are many theories connected with docking, some associated with ancient taboos but it is possible that a working dog with such a brush as an OES could carry would soon get into a filthy condition and this could be the reason for its adoption.
In the latter half of the last century there were quite a number of specimens of the breed in existence, notably in Sussex, hence the occasional reference to the "Sussex Bobtail". As far as is known the start of true breeding was carried out by R. J. Lloyd Price of Rhiwlas who founded his stock from Sussex. He was followed by Parry Thomas and W. T. S. Tilley amongst others.
Most of these early breeders concentrated on developing strong working stock and it was not until 1873 that a class for the breed was instituted at Birmingham Show which drew three exhibits.
FAMOUS
OES

Mrs. Fare-Fosse was well known in 1899 for breeding a famous bitch called Champion Fairweather. At 9 months old, she was shown and won four firsts and the C.C. 3 weeks later she won a 2nd CC. and at Bristol just over a year later was made champion. She won 19 CCs in all and was the first breed record holder. She won 5 CCs at Crufts, a record that still stands. She can be seen preserved at the Tring Natural History Museum, Herts. From the turn of the century until 1914 about 180 dogs were registered with The Kennel Club and some 14 breed championship shows were held each year.
A famous stud dog at this time was Ch. Tip Top Weather who was sold to the USA in 1916 for $4,000. His stock formed many of the post war dogs.
Between 1918 and 1939 there were 3 well known kennels "Pickhurst", "Pastorale" and "Hillgarth". In 1947 CCs were first awarded at 6 shows. 274 dogs were registered that year and this gradually increased to 400 over the next 25 years. The came about the paint commercials and the breed became sought after. In the 70's registrations were over 5,500 and this caused many rescue problems. Championship shows with CCs increased and several well known dogs won these. Currently the breed record holder is Ch. Lameda-Zottel Flamboyant and his dam Ch. Zottel Miss Marple of Lameda holds the bitch CC record of 51 CCs. She has had 21 champion puppies - a world breed record.

This is not a breed for everyone, despite its appeal; the coat can take 2-3 hours grooming weekly for a pet and much much more for a show dog. The rear end must be attended to and in inclement weather the compulsory daily walk will finish with a muddy and wet dog needing attention. A fastidious house owner should not consider this breed. OES are not suitable for flats if there is no garden access, plenty of nearby walks and space to exercise, nor should they be in a house without a garden or with owners who are out at work as these dogs need companionship and attention as the loneliness leads to boredom which in turn could lead to destruction of their surroundings.

Several short walks a day are just as good as one long one and they are quite happy to run in a park or go to the shops but they do need company and to socialise with people and other dogs.

A well cared and presentable OES is always a pleasure to meet and they will give you total undying loyalty for 10-12 + years.

DOs

AND

DON'Ts

A few "don'ts" as a result of accidents that have been told to me-

Don't leave your dog off a lead near any roadside. Even the most trustworthy dog sometimes cannot resist the urge to chase a cat or they can be frightened by a car back-firing etc.

Please don't exercise your dog alongside a bicycle - horrendous accidents do happen . Your dog needs the time to enjoy the outside environment where sniffing around and learning about the habitation in their surroundings are part of their natural instincts and this makes the exercise part of a learning process. Long jogs are really not to be recommended for the Old English and your dog may have a hidden health problem of which you may not have not been aware and then you could be causing undue suffering. Very short jogging periods are sometimes enjoyed by the younger dog but they'd be much happier with time to take in their surroundings!

For those in wheelchairs, someone sells a metal rod that is attached to the wheelchair and the dog can be connected to the end of the rod. This prevents it seems, the dog getting run over by the wheelchair.

Don't exercise your dog from a skateboard for the aforesaid reason of causing unnecessary injury and suffering to your dog.

Don't let your dog's hair fall over its eyes unless the wind is blowing sand or debris into their face. Put a soft braid in. I know a breeder who was devastated when her unclipped dog smashed into a tree and had to be put down as its nose was split open and the Vet. could not save it.

Don't leave your dogs alone in your car when the sun is out or when the air temperature is high. Check them regularly and leave a non-spill bowl of water in with them. Keep their ears and feet cool to reduce temperature (they sweat through these).

Don't leave off a lead on walks near cliff edges/quarries etc. Have been known to run/fall over edge. Likewise don't let them jump up on walls as they can assume that the height of the wall on the far side is the same as the side they have jumped up on and could fall to their death if it is a steep drop on the other side.

Don't leave your dog off the lead near sheep or farm animals. The farmer could shoot your dog if near his sheep and running free.

Don't play tugging games with your dog – bad for a young dog's teeth. Can cause accidental and unintentional aggressiveness or injury. In the wild a dog would tug for possession of food and this is a natural instinct.

If your dog is pacing around and cannot settle and doesn't want to lie down, you may have a dog in bad pain especially if yelps accompany movement. Don't wait, seek Veterinary attention immediately.

Thoughts on squeaky toys and back to natrual instincts. Could it be possible that a dog will interpret squeaky noises as they might if still non-domesticated? A vulnerable prey? Don't leave a baby or toddler unattended with a dog

 
PAB 5/2/11 updated 21/10/19